Celebrity Drug Addiction Inspires Others to Seek Treatment

Celebrity Drug Addiction Inspires Others to Seek Treatment

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Celebrity drug addiction is a common occurrence among musicians, actors, sports figures, and the modeling world. Fans put their favorite celebrities on pedestals and forget that they are people, too, who suffer from various ailments and vices just like common, everyday people. Their celebrity status does not prevent them from addictions; instead, that status may increase their risk of becoming dependent on drugs or alcohol.

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Like common people, celebrities also deal with medical, physical, spiritual, and emotional distresses. Even though they earn more money than the average person, they also suffer a larger amount of stress, worry, and financial problems associated with those earnings. Being a public figure offers its fair share of high expectations of role model status. Many celebrities use their money to buy more drugs and alcohol than the average person even if they regularly donate to various charities. They also enjoy the party and social scenes where drug and alcohol use is common. Many who desire to remain sober feel embarrassed or out of place when participating in the social circles.

Musicians enduring drug addiction include Eddie Van Halen who has had problems with alcohol, cocaine, and crystal meth. Whitney Houston’s vices have been cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol. Cocaine and marijuana were also what David Bowie was addicted to at one time. Actor Drew Barrymore was hooked on alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana at a very young age as was Robert Downey, Jr. with alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and valium. Model Kate Moss lost many modeling contracts due to her cocaine addiction.

Drug and alcohol addictions have caused the deaths of many gifted celebrities. Actress and singer Judy Garland died in 1969 of a prescription drug overdose, musician Jimi Hendrix battled alcohol and barbiturate addiction until his death in 1970, and singer Janis Joplin died of a heroin overdose in 1970. Actors John Belushi and Chris Farley, both from Saturday Night Live, died in 1982 and 1997 respectfully due to their cocaine and heroin addictions. Singer Bobby Hatfield of the Righteous Brothers died in 2003 as a result of his cocaine use.

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Rehab centers teach addicts how to help themselves and others. They are taught good, positive habits and behaviors to enable them to cope with and live their lives without addictions and how to combat temptation. Celebrity Rehab and Sober House were reality shows on the cable television station VH1. Dr. Drew Pinsky treats celebrities with addictions at the Pasadena Recovery Center in a drug free, sober environment. Famous alumni include actor Jeff Conaway who was addicted to alcohol, cocaine, and prescription pain killers. Actress Brigitte Nielsen and basketball player Dennis Rodman battled their alcohol addictions there, and Mackenzie Phillips overcame her addiction to alcohol and cocaine.

There are many celebrity rehab centers to teach celebrities how to live a sober life. Promises is located in Malibu, California and has helped actors Charlie Sheen, Matthew Perry, and Ben Affleck. Cirque Lodge in Sundance, Utah was the place for actresses Mary Kate Olsen and Kirsten Dunst. The Betty Ford Clinic was founded by Betty Ford who suffered from depression, prescription pain killers, and alcohol. Located in Rancho Mirage, California, celebrities such as David Hasselhoff, Ozzy Osbourne, and Alice Cooper have enlisted help to overcome their addictions.

Showing the public the real life drug and alcohol battles of celebrities lets fans know that their favorite actors, musicians, and sports figures are not exempt from the same vices that haunt common people. If a celebrity is brave enough to show his or her flaws to the fans, then their strength may just inspire others to confront their own addictions and seek treatment.

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