10 Reasons Why Addiction Treatment is the Bargain of a Lifetime

10 Reasons Why Addiction Treatment is the Bargain of a Lifetime

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Some people believe that addiction treatment is rather expensive. They might even be outraged that addiction treatment services could possibly cost so much money, and not understand why the success rates are not higher than what they are.

But quality treatment is actually the deal of a lifetime. Here’s why:

1. Continuing to use drugs and alcohol is a huge financial drain to the individual.
2. Good treatment for addiction can yield tremendous spiritual growth.
3. Relationships are eventually restored following successful treatment.
4. Life experience is enriched as recovery puts the focus back on learning.
5. There is a focus in recovery on personal growth and continuous self improvement.
6. Those who succeed in recovery learn to do more with less, enjoying the benefits and spiritual gains from humility, simplicity, and a new sense of gratitude.
7. People in recovery have a renewed sense of energy for life, and can thus tackle new growth experiences that were previously closed to them.
8. When treatment is successful, it multiplies our success in other areas of our lives.
9. Healthy people in addiction recovery will naturally embrace holistic health, learning to treat their mind, body and soul with great care.
10. The successfully recovering addict or alcohol can now, in turn, help others to recover.

Continuing to use drugs and alcohol is a huge financial drain to the individual

The cost of drug addiction and alcoholism is absolutely staggering. Most drug rehabs do an exercise whereby they have everybody take out pencil and paper and attempt to calculate everything they have spent on drugs and alcohol. But actually they have them go a step further and have them total up all of the money that was spent due to their addiction in general. This includes incidental costs such as legal fees, wrecked cars, lost homes, and so on.

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The outcome of such an exercise is always shocking. Every single person underestimates what their addiction has cost them. It is only through carefully adding up the full, true impact that their disease has had on them that they can really see what it has cost them. Most people who have been using drugs and alcohol for several years have spent at least a quarter of a million dollars on their disease. Some people who have been using for decades have spent over a million dollars.

Unbelievably, some people who do this exercise that have been homeless and living in the streets for years come to learn that they spent more on their addiction than what it costs to live quite comfortably in modest housing.

All of this points to an obvious truth about addiction and money: continuing to abuse drugs and alcohol is expensive, and the costs accumulate rapidly over time.

Good treatment for addiction can yield tremendous spiritual growth

What price can you possibly put on your soul, and on your spiritual welfare? None, of course. The benefits and gains that you get from a life changed from addiction to one of spiritual quest are absolutely enormous. Upon seeking a spiritual path, the recovering addict will:

1) Learn to appreciate the small things in life, and find enjoyment in their fellow man rather than in getting wasted or accumulating things.

2) Become happy to be able to help others, and receive benefit themselves from doing so.

3) Learn to accept reality for what it is and stop struggling against the nature of existence. Change will be driven internally and lead to personal growth, rather than trying to manipulate the world.

4) Become infinitely happier overall, as the spiritual experience will wake them up to a life they never knew, and one that they did not think was possible for them.

5) Lead to joy in recovery as they continue to grow along a spiritual path, finding delight in helping themselves and helping others.

If you could pay money to achieve a spiritual transformation of this nature, without having to do any hard work, the line of customers would be miles long. As you can guess, it just doesn’t work that way. When we check into treatment for addiction, we are paying for the opportunity to experience this new life. Much of the motivation, willingness, and conviction must come from within, and will be the deciding factor as to how desperately we seek this spiritual life.

The price of this spiritual journey is paid more with our ego than with our dollars. Most addicts and alcoholics will not understand this at first, but will be able to see the transformation when they look back one day. This is why they say we have to “surrender to win.”

Relationships are eventually restored following successful treatment

Again, what price can we put on restoring our damaged relationships to amicable levels? While it is not a given that you will instantly be able to right all of your wrongs in recovery, most alcoholics who earnestly work on themselves following treatment can honestly say that all of their relationships have improved in a major way.

This success with our relationships with others is based first and foremost on our new found abstinence. Using drugs and alcohol on a regular basis undermines our relationships with others by isolating us, leading to manipulation, and pushing the alcoholic to lie and be dishonest. In order to even make a start on repairing any of this, a baseline of abstinence must be established and the alcoholic has to earnestly push themselves to grow as a person.

It is not enough, in recovery, to stop drinking and using drugs and then apologize. The act of reconciliation must come from a positive change in who the alcoholic really is at a fundamental level. In other words, the person must be actively growing as a person and seeking to help others if they are to restore their relationships.

For those who have followed this path in recovery, and grown as a person in positive ways and found their relationships healing over time, what do you think the value of this transformation is in their lives? Clearly, the value is priceless, and our deep and growing connections with our friends and families becomes a huge part of what we grow to cherish in our recovery.

Life experience is enriched as recovery puts the focus back on learning

When you first check into rehab and start your new journey in recovery, what do you really know about staying clean and sober?

Answer: Not a darn thing.

If we did know anything about it, we probably would not need rehab to begin with, right? And of course, it is not so much that we need to know what to do, it is that we need to learn the mechanics of recovery and experience then in our daily lives.

And so, our path in early recovery is defined by an enormous amount of learning. While this may sound tedious at first, it is actually an enriching experience that opens your life up to all sorts of possibilities.

We have to learn how to live clean and sober, and avoid chemicals. We have to learn how to deal with everyday stress in our lives without resorting to self medicating. We have to learn how to ask for help and find support in our life. We have to learn how to manage our relationships. And of course, we have to learn how to deal with our feelings and our emotions without using our drug of choice.

And all that is just for starters! Our quest for more learning will run much deeper than this as we continue to stay clean and sober. Eventually, every event in our lives becomes a learning tool. Even seemingly “negative” experiences become an opportunity to learn something valuable about ourselves.

Even if you managed to stay sober without this learning focused type of recovery, your life would not be nearly as fulfilling. Addiction treatment helps to put you on a more enlightened path because they emphasize learning and experience as a means of recovery.

There is a focus in recovery on personal growth and continuous self improvement

The incremental power that is derived from a lifetime in recovery is absolutely astounding. Imagine two people in addiction recovery: one of them does not go into rehab, stops drinking and using drugs cold turkey, and basically lives out the rest of their life merely abstaining from chemicals, but without really giving much thought or effort to their recovery. They simply abstain and are what we might refer to as a “dry drunk.”

The other person goes to rehab and learns about the joy, positive learning experiences, and spiritual journey that can be such a central part of their recovery. This person lives out the rest of their life in a state of continuous learning, constantly seeking to help others in recovery, and pushing themselves to a be a better person through continuous self analysis. They abstain from chemicals but their focus is really on becoming a better person through a spiritual quest and the push for constant self improvement.

Which person do you think will have a better, happier, and more fulfilling life?

Focusing on personal growth in recovery makes a lot of sense–not only from the standpoint of happiness and contentment, but also from the perspective that it will help to insure continued sobriety. We are much more likely to stay clean and sober if we are always pushing ourselves to become a better person and reaping the benefits of doing so.

Those who succeed in recovery learn to do more with less, enjoying the benefits and spiritual gains from humility, simplicity, and a new sense of gratitude

The spiritual gains that we make in recovery allow us to appreciate the simple things in life. What used to be boring to us now becomes meaningful and even delightful when we are clean and sober. We start to care about things that we had lost touch with in our addiction.

Part of this spiritual transformation comes from our renewed sense of humility in early recovery. We come to realize that we have to learn from every new experience in recovery and use this knowledge to help us stay clean. But another part of this spirituality comes from our new focus on gratitude, in that we start to appreciate how much better our life has become now that we no longer have to self medicate and lie to ourselves and to others.

Thus, our spiritual growth in early recovery really takes off in several different dimensions, and this renewed spiritual connection is priceless in value. Ask any person who has achieved long term sobriety how much they value their spirituality, and you can bet that they will say it is the most important thing in their lives today.

People in recovery have a renewed sense of energy for life, and can thus tackle new growth experiences that were previously closed to them

Recovery gives us the energy to pursue new things, and actually encourages us to do so. In our active addiction, most of use became closed off to new experiences in our lives, and we were content to get our drug of choice and simply stay isolated and medicate ourselves with it. The addict is trapped in a cycle, and is basically stuck from getting out in their life and experiencing new things.

Recovery turns that all around by stripping the drugs and the alcohol away entirely, leading the recovering addict to question: “What next?” And as their body starts to heal from the detox process and the fog starts to lift from their mind, the recovering addict will–with renewed energy and spirit–start to pursue the things in their life that they were once passionate about.

All of us had things in our lives that slipped away from us as the drugs and the alcohol took over our lives. We all let go of dreams, passions, and goals that we wanted to achieve. The amazing thing about recovery is that all of that stuff comes back to us, and takes on all the meaning that it previously held for us.

Of course, this may not happen on the first day of recovery or even in the first month. Restoring passion to our life is a process that has to unfold in its own time. But anyone who stays clean in recovery and seeks to better their life will find themselves returning to their goals, their passions, and even their childhood dreams. The world becomes your oyster in recovery, as your sharpened mind and heightened sense of clarity allow you to achieve the things that you thought had slipped out of your reach forever during active addiction.

When treatment is successful, it multiplies our success in other areas of our lives

The positive gains from recovery have a cumulative effect. Holistic growth in recovery tends to breed even more success. There is a synergistic effect from experiencing personal growth in so many different areas of your life at the same time.

In other words, when things start getting good, they get really good!

What are some examples of this? Picture the addict or alcoholic in recovery who….

….explores their spirituality, and in doing so, makes close connections with a support group that can help them stay clean.

….exercises on a regular basis, and in doing so, overcomes depression and also develop the motivation to quit smoking cigarettes.

….attends 12 step meetings, and in doing so, finds others in recovery that they can reach out and help, strengthening their own recovery in the process.

….learns to be accountable to others in recovery, and in turn, applies this responsible attitude to their own personal relationships, thus improving their family life.

….gains the discipline needed to stay sober during tough times, and in doing so, gains the knowledge needed to overcome other challenges in their life.

….starts to practice gratitude on a regular basis, and in doing so, improves outcomes in nearly every aspect of their life due to an improved attitude.

And so on.

The benefits that we gain in recovery transfer to every area of our life. When start to live healthier in recovery and continue to network with other healthy people, our general direction will always be positive if we are pushing ourselves to improve.

Healthy people in addiction recovery will naturally embrace holistic health, learning to treat their mind, body and soul with great care

Recovery from addiction is an exercise in improving our health. We can define it in other ways, of course, but one way to look at it is strictly in terms of living healthier. It is healthy to stop dumping toxic chemicals into our bodies on a regular basis.

But as we have hinted at already, the real gains in recovery come from an holistic approach to overcoming addiction that addresses every aspect of life. So physical fitness and nutrition should not be neglected. Nor should mental health or emotional well being. Nor should spirituality or our relationships be overlooked.

The ideal treatment for addiction is always going to be holistic in nature, because that is the only solution that is truly comprehensive. Every other approach to addiction treatment is going to leave gaps and holes that the addict may slip through at some point.

One good example of this is in observing health related relapses in recovery. Researchers have studied people who have relapsed in recovery and found that a surprisingly high number of them actually relapsed as a complication due to injury or illness. The person got sick, and this eventually–somehow or in some way–led them back to their drug of choice.

This should be a strong indicator that holistic health is an important aspect of recovery. We have to go beyond spiritual health and include our physical well being. We have to start exercising and stop smoking cigarettes, and so on. Seeking overall health in our recovery should always be a priority, because poor health–regardless of the cause–can be a contributing factor to relapse.

The successfully recovering addict or alcohol can now, in turn, help others to recover

One of the biggest payoffs of treating addiction is that the recovering addict or alcoholic can now help others in recovery. In fact, this is one of the key factors in maintaining sobriety, and is probably the strongest activity that someone can engage in during their recovery to help insure continued abstinence.

But the real value is in spreading the message of hope, and having people in recovery help others who are struggling. An army of addicts helping addicts, help given to the newcomer with nothing expected in return. This creates a wave of positive influence that ripples out to anyone who is willing to ask for help.

So the real value in going to rehab is that you get yourself back. You gain the whole world in recovery, and then you get to give it back to others. This is how it all comes full circle.

If you are struggling with addiction, get the help that you need today.

It’s worth it.

 

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