Symptoms of Opiate Addiction

Symptoms of Opiate Addiction

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What are some of the symptoms of opiate addiction?  They might include:

1) Running out of painkiller prescriptions early.  Using up the medication before it is supposed to be gone.

2) Using multiple doctors to get more pain medicine.  Manipulating doctors to receive stronger or higher dosages.

3) Faking illness or injury to get pain medication prescribed.  Actually inflicting damage to the body in order to receive pain medication.

4) Lying about how much medicine or what medicine they have taken.

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5) Hiding or stashing pills.

6) Buying medicine from illegal sources or off the street.

Drug addicts who are taking opiates will probably appear to be normal unless they are taking very powerful opiates such as heroin or methadone.  Then they might nod off or appear to be buzzed.  But most addicts who are addicted to opiates will be at a point where they have to take the drugs just to feel normal again and be able to function properly.  Thus they will only appear to be messed up when they cannot get any more opiates and are going into withdrawal.

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Creative Commons License photo credit: Nico Paix

At that point they might have symptoms that resemble the flu.  Upset stomach, stomach cramps, anxiety, restlessness, tremor, or hot and cold sweats might result from this.  Anyone who is in opiate withdrawal will eventually have some of these symptoms, but usually not all of them.  Withdrawal affects everyone differently so it is difficult to determine exactly what symptoms will be there for people.

If you are trying to get off of opiate medication and you find it difficult to do so, then you might consider getting some form of opiate addiction treatment.  There they can detox you properly and give you medication to help you with the withdrawal symptoms.  You could also go the route of ultra rapid detox, though that is much more expensive for most people as it is not covered by insurance, plus it is a bit of a risky procedure in some cases.  Basically they put you under for a few hours and then when you wake up you are fully detoxed and experience very few withdrawal symptoms after that.  Success rates are not necessarily any higher with this treatment than they are with traditional drug rehab, though.

If you want to change your life and do something about opiate addiction then you have to take real action.  Wishing the problem away never works.  It will not go away on its own and will always resurface unless you take action to treat it.

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